You are here
Home > Critic > Why HAUSA RAP Industry Is Weak – Rahama Sa’adau VS ClassiQ

Why HAUSA RAP Industry Is Weak – Rahama Sa’adau VS ClassiQ

Rahama Sadau was banned from Kannywood, expelled for getting too mushy with ClassiQ in his new video “I Love You” after an embrace that happened on the set of a music video but was felt around the arewa world. Rahama sadaus ban is something to talk about.

The ban was placed on her by the Motion Picture Practitioners Association of Nigeria (MOPPAN), the body that governs Kannywood professionals.

MOPPAN’s chairman, Muhammadu Kabiru Maikaba, told the BBC Hausa service that the ban was

 “total”.

“This is not the first time that she has been doing these wayward things. We have been warning her, but she still went ahead to dent our image”

The first statement containing the ban was dated October 2 and signed by the Secretary of the association, Salisu Mohammed and it also warned other actors and actresses to henceforth follow the rules binding their participation in the Kannywood film industry.

Rahama has apologized for her actions and ClassiQ has tried to exonerate his lead model by shouldering all the blame.

Classiq’s reaction

Hausa rap musician spoke out

“I actually asked and begged Rahama Sadau to be part of the video because she is a popular figure in the entertainment industry and that is all. I wanted a popular face in the video”

“When the whole thing blew because of her appearance in the video, I got shocked. In fact I am still not myself till now. I am shocked by her expulsion. I keep feeling it is because of my video that she got expelled from the industry and that is not good at all. She is a good person. We are not in any way trying to prove a point or step on any body’s toe”

READ: Who is the king of Hausa hip hop? cast your votes now

”I think she should have been suspended and warned instead of expulsion. She is a great actress. The regulatory body should have placed her on last warning. Outright expulsion is not a good thing. I am appealing to MOPPAN to please revisit the sanction and help the actress.”

Actor Deyemi Okanlawon took to Instagram asking the industry to support the actress.

“Dear fellow actors isn’t Kannywood a part of Nollywood. Shouldn’t we support our own? I have some amazing Muslims in my family, spent time up North and I’m very conscious of the tenets of Islam… seen the music video yet I still don’t understand the ban… Di’ja you’ve said it all. Allah ya tamake mu duka “

The ban hasn’t been lifted as of today but if you pay close attention, you’d see the sexist and religious undertone in the pronouncement.

Kannywood has been under fire from conservative Muslim clerics who accuse it of “corrupting people’s values”, a sentiment that you can only understand if you’ve mixed with deeply religious Muslims.

In the north, for instance, when you meet a lady who is visibly dressed like a Muslim for the first time, you’re never sure exactly how to greet her. You often end up forcing a smile and bowing you head slightly will “Sannu”. It’s better that than being embarrassed because she will let your right hand hang if you stretch it pit for a handshake.

At that moment, there’s a culture clash inspired by religion and ideology. In most other parts of the country, and with almost every other woman, you would have stretched out a hand without hesitation.

Perhaps that’s why it’s so difficult for many around the country to understand why a simple embrace is causing the largest fire in Kano since Tudun Wada got burnt down.

Under strict interpretation, it is not permissible in Islam for two non relatives of the opposite sex to share a hug or even a handshake. That’s the religious and ideological undertone of MOPPAN’s rebuke.

It’s important that we isolate this from culture and tradition because even though Kannywood represents a region of the country’s entertainment space, not every northerner would necessarily be offended when they watch ClassiQ’s “I Love You” video.

But founding principles should not be ignored, if two non relatives cuddling is unacceptable and MOPPAN has imbibed this ideology into its practices, then we just have to find an alternative.

There is a hypocritical double standard; when a woman hugging a man is met with greater outrage than a man hugging a woman. It is also unacceptable, it’d plain sexism.

This is an accusation that has been leveled against Kannywood and its governing body MOPPAN, actor Ali Nuhu and singer Sani Danja in particular has come under intense scrutiny for scenes like these that have gone unpunished.

What’s good for the goose is good for the gander but the problem is that MOPPAN seem to have far more gander than it does goose, so as long as only the gander enforce the rules, the gander will seldom fall short of them.

What do I mean? I mean that MOPPAN is an organization where women are poorly represented at the leadership level, with only 2 out of over 30 members as recently as 2010. That list was modified the following year, when the executives were dissolved and no women were added.

If MOPPAN had a more gender diverse leadership, I wonder if a woman would have been the first scapegoat for its moral stand. I wonder if the judgment would have been so swift and unanimous and arrived at after only a few days and in the actor’s absence.

I wonder if the penalty would have been so severe. I wonder if Kannywood would have been expending so much energy in trying to end the career of one of its brightest daughters.

Such is the level of sexism that screams at you when you hear this judgment and unlike religion and ideology, it’s not even an undertone, it’s as conspicuous as Kemi Adeosun’s British accent, its a damn shame.

By banning Rahama to serve as a deterrent, MOPPAN is working with the belief that art is an influencer and society will imitate what they see on screen.

That assumption is fine but MOPPAN overlooked the fact that art also imitates society, so to denounce a work of art doesn’t mean it stops being a part of people’s lives, because it’s already a part of people’s lives and that’s exactly why artists were bold enough to make it into

“I love you” could yet become a seminal moment for Hausa rap, the song and its video celebrate love in ways that some do not find appropriate but it’s the reality of what young people do these days.

Denouncing it and banning Rahama won’t stop young northerners from hugging and kissing, they are doing it already.

If anything, it drives a further wedge between them and a society that Hausa rap, by design, challenges. Hip hop encourages us to disrupt and rebel against this kind of tyranny from time to time.

But this only goes to show that Arewa hip hop is not going to become strong enough to have its own voice anytime soon.  It has to eventually rebel against the culturally accepted norms and state its own rules, otherwise it will remain weak.

Watch the video on YouTube

Over to you

OG Adoga
I am a Rap Music Instructor, Hip Hop Culture Custodian, Social Media Expert, all round smooth operator and chief editor at Hip Hop Head. If you want to become a member of Hip Hop Head, simply visit Join us page.To reach me, get my personal details from the Contact page.

Leave a Reply

Top